Cookies & Privacy Policy

Personal Information

We collect Personal Information when you knowingly provide it, including when you register for the newsletter, contact us, or request information. Personal Information is information that may be used to identify or locate an individual, like a person’s full name, postal address, e-mail address, or phone number, as well as other non-public information that is associated with this Personal Information. We use your Personal Information to send communications, to respond to your enquiries, and to send marketing and promotional messages.

Non-Personally Identifiable Information

We collect Non-Personally Identifiable Information automatically when you visit our Site. Non-Personally Identifiable Information is information that is not used nor intended to be used to personally identify an individual and is not associated with nor linked to Personal Information. This Non-Personally Identifiable Information we collect via the Site includes your Internet Protocol address, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request, and the web page you have visited immediately prior to visiting the Site.

Norton Air Conditioning Ltd will make no attempt to track or identify individual users, except where there is a reasonable suspicion that unauthorised access to systems is being attempted. In the case of all users, Norton Air Conditioning Ltd reserves the right to attempt to identify and track any individual who is reasonably suspected of trying to gain unauthorised access to computer systems or resources operating as part of Norton Air Conditioning Ltd's web services.

As a condition of use of this site, all users must give permission for Norton Air Conditioning Ltd to use its access logs to attempt to track users who are reasonably suspected of gaining, or attempting to gain, unauthorised access.

All log file information collected by Norton Air Conditioning Ltd is kept secure and no access to raw log files is given to any third party.

How we use Cookies

Cookies are small text files stored on your computer when you visit websites. We use cookies to help identify your computer so we can tailor your user experience.

There are two ‘flavours’ of Cookies - ‘Session’ cookies and ‘Persistent’ cookies.

Session cookies are temporary and are deleted when you shut down your Web browser or turn off your computer. These are used to improve how you navigate through a website.

‘Persistent’ cookies remain on your computer until manually deleted or when they reach an expiry date. They hold information that is useful if you revisit the website, such as contact form details previosuly submitted.

You can disable cookies already stored on your computer, but this may stop our website and others from functioning properly. It may also cause saved login details, for example, to be deleted, so ensure you have a note of them before deleting all cookies.

Essential Cookies

The following is strictly necessary in the operation of our website. If you choose to allow them, cookies placed on your computer by our website will, where applicable:

No current essential cookies.

Non-essential Cookies

The following are not strictly necessary but are required to provide you with the best user experience and tell us, anonymously, which pages people find most interesting.

Functional Cookies

Typically used for tracking the pages you visit. Page tracking data is collated by Google on behalf of millions of website owners, providing anonymous data on which pages you visited, how you got there, the page you exited the website from and so on. It allows us to see which pages are more or less popular and helps us to make our website even better.

Targeting Cookies

These allow you, for example, to share pages with social networks such as Facebook (where applicable).

Data Sharing Policy

This website will not share any personal information with third parties.

The table below explains the cookies we use and why

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Google Analytics: We use Google Analytics to monitor traffic levels, search queries and visits to this website.

Google Analytics stores IP address anonymously on its servers in the US, and neither CIVIC or Google associate your IP address with any personally identifiable information.

These cookies enable Google to determine whether you are a return visitor to the site, and to track the pages that you visit during your session.

cc_social, cc_analytics Cookie Control: The cookie tool on this website remembers your privacy settings for the next time you visit the website. The cookie stores your preferences for both Social Media and Google Analytics Cookies.
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For a selection of air conditioning systems in Reading, call us today.

01189 333 999

FAQs

What is air conditioning?

A system for controlling the humidity, ventilation, and temperature in a building, typically to maintain a cool atmosphere in warm conditions.

How does air conditioning work?

Air conditioners use chemicals (refrigerants) that easily convert from a gas to a liquid and back again. This chemical is used to transfer heat from the air inside of a building to the outside air.

The machine has three main parts. They are a compressor, a condenser and an evaporator. The compressor and condenser are usually located on the outside. The evaporator is located inside the building.

The working fluid arrives at the compressor as a cool, low-pressure gas. The compressor squeezes the fluid. This packs the molecule of the fluid closer together. The closer the molecules are together, the higher its energy and its temperature.

The working fluid leaves the compressor as a hot, high pressure gas and flows into the condenser.

When the working fluid leaves the condenser, its temperature is much cooler, and it has changed from a gas to a liquid under high pressure. The liquid goes into the evaporator through an orifice (a very tiny, narrow hole). On the other side, the liquid’s pressure drops. When it does it begins to evaporate into a gas.

As the liquid changes to gas and evaporates, it extracts heat from the air around it.

By the time the working fluid leaves the evaporator, it is a cool, low pressure gas. It then returns to the compressor to begin its trip all over again.

This continues over and over and over until the room reaches the temperature you want the room cooled to. The thermostat senses that the temperature has reached the right setting and turns off the air conditioner. As the room warms up, the thermostat turns the air conditioner back on until the room reaches the temperature.

What types of air conditioning systems are there?

Split Systems

Split AC Systems only have two units, one inside the building and the other outside. The units are joined together by interconnecting pipework and cables. These systems are usually used to condition the air in a single room.

Twin-Split Systems

Twin split systems contain two indoor units connected to a singular outdoor unit. A branching kit is used in the pipework to connect all units together. This type of system can be used in a large single room to distribute air flow better.

Multi-Split Systems

Multi split systems, again have a singular outdoor unit but can have up to five indoor units connected to it. Each indoor unit has its own pipework connected directly to the outdoor unit. These systems are used to condition the air in different rooms in a building, giving individual control of room temperature settings. Though only either heating or cooling can be used at any one time.

Packaged Systems

In packaged systems, all the main components are encased in one unit and are used for bigger applications than the split systems. The unit is usually located on flat roof tops and ducting is used to supply large rooms/whole buildings with conditioned air.

Heat Recovery VRF Systems

These systems are usually used in large buildings with many rooms and many occupants. They can simultaneously provide heating and cooling to different rooms when required. These systems are complex with sophisticated technology. A large condensing unit (or many linked together) is installed outside, with many indoor units connected to the pipework.

What is a Heat Pump?

Heat pumps are integral to an air-conditioning system, transferring heat from one environment to another via a refrigerant. Heat pumps also offer a cost-effective heating solution – and air source heat pumps are recognised as a renewable heat technology.

In cooling mode, heat pumps work by transferring the heat from a room or internal space to the outside air, thus cooling the inside area. In reverse, heat pumps can extract latent heat from the outside air (even when the temperature outside is down to -20°C) and pump it inside to heat indoor spaces.

How energy efficient are air conditioning systems?

An air conditioner’s efficiency is measured by the energy efficiency ratio (EER). The EER is the ratio of the cooling capacity (in kW) to the power input (in Kw). The higher the EER rating, the more efficient the air conditioner.

Air conditioning systems can be very energy efficient. Most new systems are given an EER rating of ‘A’, some can even be given an ‘A+++’ rating in both heating and cooling.

A systems efficiency also greatly depends on the installation. Correct equipment selection is vital, so a survey is strongly recommended before any installation work is carried out.

Once installed, regular maintenance will keep the system running as efficiently as possible.

Do I need my air conditioning system serviced?

It is recommended that an air conditioning system is serviced at least once a year, in many other instances, maintenance may be required two, three or four times annually.

In residential properties where a system may only be used for half a year, a service once a year may be sufficient. In commercial properties, such as office buildings, it may require two visits annually. In other instances, such as hotels and hairdressers for example, systems may require four visits annually to keep them running efficiently.

After a new installation, for warranty purposes, the manufacturer of the equipment may insist on regular servicing for up to three years.

The amount of refrigerant inside a system may also dictate how many maintenance visits are required annually. If a system contains over a certain amount of refrigerant, then it may need an annual leak test under the 2014 EU F-Gas Regulation. Larger systems may require six-monthly or three-monthly leak tests.

What is the 2014 EU F-Gas Regulation?

Fluorinated gases (‘F-gases’) are a family of man-made gases used in a range of applications. In this case, refrigerants in air conditioning systems. Because they do not damage the atmospheric ozone layer, they are often used as substitutes for ozone-depleting substances. However, F-gases are powerful greenhouse gases, with a global warming effect up to 23 000 times greater than carbon dioxide (CO2), and their emissions are rising strongly.

The European Union is therefore taking regulatory action to control F-gases as part of its policy to combat climate change.

F-Gas tests are therefore a mandatory requirement on systems that fall into the threshold for leak testing. Records of the leak test results must be kept.

My air conditioning system isn’t working – what should I do next?

If this unfortunate circumstance occurs, it is best to call in the experts. An engineer will need to attend to check on the system, but time and money can be saved by taking a few notes before making the call. Note the make, model and serial number of the faulty unit. Also, check on the controller, a fault code may be visible, make a note of this too. With any extra information, the attending engineer can be prepared to find the fault quickly or even fix the problem first time of asking.

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